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Houseplant Habits: The Unexpected

Houseplant Habits: The Unexpected

While a flourishing houseplant is always the goal, certain issues can strike over time. In this blog post, we’ll unravel common but abnormal houseplant ailments and equip you with the knowledge to restore your plant’s health.

Pests

Identification: Tiny intruders like spider mites, thrips, or mealybugs can silently and quickly compromise your plant’s health.

Spider mites: Tiny arachnids that often go unnoticed until they’ve spun their web beneath leaves and around the stems of your plant. These nearly invisible pests extract nutrients from plant cells and multiply and spread rapidly. The damage manifests as yellowing, speckling, and eventual browning of leaves. To spot spider mites, inspect the underside of leaves closely - use a magnifying glass if you need to!

Thrips: Slender, winged insects usually no more than 2mm in length. These pests feast on sap by puncturing leaf cells and draining the contents. Thrips leave behind stippled, silvery streaks on leaves, wonky growth, and can cause premature leaf drop. To identify these, look for tiny, off-white to nearly black slow-moving bugs on the tops and undersides of your leaves.

Mealybugs: Small, soft-bodied insects covered in a cotton-like substance that forms a protective armor. Ranging from 1-5mm, they cluster on the underside of leaves, leaf joints, and stems. Mealies feed on plant sap, causing wilting, yellowing, and distorted growth. Their coating makes them appear fluffy and protects them from many insecticides. Just look for clusters of white cotton on your plant!

Solution: Regularly inspect your plants for signs of pests - sticky residue, webbing, or visible insects. Explore a pest prevention routine even before you have an outbreak with pesticides and insecticides. If you spot any crawlers on a plant, isolate it ASAP.

Fungal Infections

Identification: Fungal infections manifest as discolored or spotted leaves, usually in a target shape with the center being dark accompanied by a yellow or orange halo.

Solution: Improve air circulation around your plants and collection and avoid overcrowding on shelves or tables. Try to adjust your watering routine to keep the foliage on the dry side and consider using a fungicide if the infection persists. Once you spot the damage on a leaf, remove and dispose of it quickly to prevent the spread.

Bacterial Infections

Identification: Bacterial infections cause wilting stems, leaf spots, and blisters on your plant.

Solution: Prune off any affected leaves quickly, disinfecting your tools between cuts. Try to avoid overhead watering to minimize moisture on the leaves and consider copper-based sprays or antibacterial treatments to manage infections.

Check out our organic plant care solutions here

Root Rot

Identification: Root rot usually presents with yellowing or wilting leaves even though the soil is moist. While inspecting the roots, you might find that they have turned soft, brown, and mushy.

Solution: Trim away any affected roots back to the healthy tissue using sterilized tools. You can mix a bit of hydrogen peroxide and water to aid in the disinfection. Since root rot often stems from overwatering, check your existing soil and ensure it isn’t too damp - if so, pot your plant in some fresh medium and be vigilant with your waterings in the future.

Prevention is the best medicine! Keeping these issues from occurring is often more straightforward than treating them. Here are some measures to keep your plants in tip-top condition:

  • Quarantine New Additions: No matter where you found your new foliage friend, isolate it for a few weeks before adding it to your collection so you can monitor for signs of pests or diseases.
  • Water Properly: Overwatering creates a perfect environment for pests and diseases. Be sure to monitor the soil moisture closely between soaks and ensure your pot has good drainage to prevent waterlogged soil.
  • Pruning: Regularly inspect your plants and trim away any dead or yellowing leaves. Pruning promotes good air circulation and reduces the risk for many ailments.

When you understand and address these ailments, you’re set up for success in creating a thriving indoor garden! Regular monitoring and preventative measures will keep your companions vibrant and resilient for many years to come.